Agenda Digest: City Commission (5/31/2022)

Ariel Fernandez

Founder & Editor
[email protected]


On Tuesday, May 31, 2022, the Coral Gables City Commission will hold its next City Commission meeting. Here are some of the more notable items on the agenda for this upcoming meeting. Click here to see the full agenda.

Non-credited quotes in this article are excerpts from the memos presented to the Commission explaining the items.

Gables Insider comments on specific items can be found in blue.

Watch Meeting

To watch the meeting live on Tuesday, May 31st at 9:00AM, click here. The meeting will also be available live on the City’s YouTube Channel. You can watch it by clicking here.

Mayor’s Comments

D-1: An update regarding the Mayor’s Citizen Advisory Council.

D-2: An update on Downtown Maintenance and the Block by Block program.

Consent Agenda

E-1: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing an encumbrance in the amount of $79,675 or 25% of State Forfeited Asset Fund (F.A.F.) moneys received in the 2019-2020 Fiscal Year, to provide for the support and operation of school resource officer, crime prevention, safe neighborhood, and drug abuse prevention programs, as required under the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act; and authorizing an amendment to the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 annual budget to recognize the transfer from reserve of State Forfeiture Funds as revenue and appropriating such funds to put toward the cost of the items described above.

“State Forfeited Asset Funds (F.A.F.) consist of the proceeds from the seizure and forfeiture of certain assets identified during criminal investigations to have been possessed or utilized in violation of the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(c)(3) requires that a local law enforcement agency receiving more than $15,000 pursuant to the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act within a fiscal year must expend or donate no less than 25% of such proceeds for the support or operation of crime prevention, drug abuse prevention, school resource officer or safe neighborhood programs. In the 2019-2020 Fiscal Year, deposits in the amount of $318,692.33 were made to the State Forfeited Assets Fund account. This allows for a 25% encumbrance of $79,675 under the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. City leadership have reviewed, vetted, and approved the Coral Gables Chief of Police’s request to encumber and expend as needed the available forfeited asset funds via memorandum dated May 11, 2022.”

E-2: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing an encumbrance in the amount of $47,397 or 25% of State Forfeited Asset Fund (F.A.F.) moneys received in the 2020-2021 Fiscal Year, to provide for the support and operation of school resource officer, crime prevention, safe neighborhood, and drug abuse prevention programs, as required under the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act; and authorizing an amendment to the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 annual budget to recognize the transfer from reserve of State Forfeiture Funds as revenue and appropriating such funds to put toward the cost of the items described above.

“State Forfeited Asset Funds (F.A.F.) consist of the proceeds from the seizure and forfeiture of certain assets identified during criminal investigations to have been possessed or utilized in violation of the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(c)(3) requires that a local law enforcement agency receiving more than $15,000 pursuant to the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act within a fiscal year must expend or donate no less than 25% of such proceeds for the support or operation of crime prevention, drug abuse prevention, school resource officer or safe neighborhood programs. In the 2020-2021 Fiscal Year, deposits in the amount of $189,585.51 were made to the State Forfeited Assets Fund account. This allows for a 25% encumbrance of $47,397 under the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. City leadership have reviewed, vetted, and approved the Coral Gables Chief of Police’s request to encumber and expend as needed the available forfeited asset funds via memorandum dated May 11, 2022.”

E-3: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing an expenditure in the amount of $16,000 from State Forfeited Asset Fund (F.A.F.) moneys, to support the 2021-2022 Fiscal Year operations of the Police Explorer Post #594 Program, conducted by the Coral Gables Police Department Youth Resource Unit; and authorizing an amendment to the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 annual budget to recognize the transfer from reserve of State Forfeiture Funds as revenue and appropriating such funds to put toward the cost of the items described above.

“State Forfeited Asset Funds (F.A.F.) consist of the proceeds from the seizure and forfeiture of certain assets identified during criminal investigations to have been possessed or utilized in violation of the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. Pursuant to the provisions of Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(c)(3), a local law enforcement agency must expend or donate no less than 25% of State Forfeited Assets for school resource officer, crime prevention, safe neighborhood and drug abuse education and prevention programs. F.A.F. monies have been encumbered to set aside funds to support Youth Resource Unit programs as required by Statute. The activities associated with the Police Explorer Post #594 Program, which are conducted by the Coral Gables Police Department Youth Resource Unit, qualify as a permissible expenditure under FSS 932.7055(5)(c)(3). City leadership have reviewed, vetted, and approved the Coral Gables Chief of Police’s request to encumber and expend as needed the available forfeited asset funds via memorandum dated May 11, 2022.”

E-4: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing an expenditure in the amount of $9,000 from encumbered State Forfeited Asset Fund (F.A.F.) moneys, to support the 2022-2023 Fiscal Year operations of the D.A.R.E. Program, conducted by the Coral Gables Police Department Youth Resource Unit; and authorizing an amendment to the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 annual budget to recognize the transfer from reserve of State Forfeiture Funds as revenue and appropriating such funds to put toward the cost of the items described above.

“State Forfeited Asset Funds (F.A.F.) consist of the proceeds from the seizure and forfeiture of certain assets identified during criminal investigations to have been possessed or utilized in violation of the Florida Contraband Forfeiture Act. Pursuant to the provisions of Florida State Statute 932.7055(5)(c)(3), a local law enforcement agency must expend or donate no less than 25% of State Forfeited Assets for school resource officer, crime prevention, safe neighborhood and drug abuse education and prevention programs. F.A.F. monies have been encumbered to set aside funds to support Youth Resource Unit programs as required by Statute. The activities associated with the D.A.R.E. Program, which are conducted by the Coral Gables Police Department Youth Resource Unit, qualify as a permissible expenditure under FSS 932.7055(5)(c)(3). City leadership have reviewed, vetted, and approved the Coral Gables Chief of Police’s request to encumber and expend as needed the available forfeited asset funds via memorandum dated May 11, 2022.”

E-5: A Resolution of the City Commission appointing Anne Boyton-Trigg (Nominated by Commissioner Anderson) to serve as a member of the Landscape Beautification Advisory Board, for remainder of a two (2) year term which began on June 1, 2021 and continues through May 31, 2023.

E-6: A Resolution of the City Commission appointing Hendrik Woods (Nominated by Vice Mayor Mena) to serve as a member of the Senior Citizens Advisory Board, for remainder of a two (2) year term which began on June 1, 2021 and continues through May 31, 2023.

E-7: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing modification to IFB 2020-024 H. George Fink Studio Restoration Project with Critical Path Services, Inc ., pursuant to Section 2-764(b), Approval of Change Orders and Contract Modifications of the City ’s Procurement Code in an estimated amount of $125,000 for additional work to be performed, as well as any other reasonable cost identified during the final delivery of this project not to exceed the available budget. Lobbyist: N/A.

“On October 13, 2020, the City Commission accepted the recommendation to award IFB Contract 2020-024 for the H. George Fink Studio Restoration Project to Critical Path Services, Inc., the lowest responsive and responsible bidder. The H. George Fink Studio was constructed in 1920 and is a local historic landmark. This contract modification request will address additional work to be incorporated into the project and is a result of unforeseen conditions, typical of a restoration project of this complexity. The Public Works Department recommends approval of this request.”

E-8: A Resolution of the City Commission renewing the parking lease agreement with the University of Miami for municipal parking lots 42 and 43 for an additional twelve (12) months beginning September 1, 2022 and ending August 31, 2023, at the rate of $72,650.06 annually, payable in equal monthly installments. Lobbyist: N/A.

“The City of Coral Gables and the University of Miami entered into a lease agreement for portions of municipal lots 42 and 43 on July 28, 2003, to provide supplemental parking for the University. The initial term of the lease was for one (1) year beginning September 1, 2003. The existing lease agreement provides for annual extensions based on the mutual agreement of both parties. The University of Miami has provided a letter, dated March 4, 2022, requesting a one-year renewal pursuant to the lease agreement. Based on the City’s parking permit rate schedule for 2020-2021, the contract rate for the September 1, 2021-August 31, 2022, renewal period will remain at $72,650.06, payable in equal monthly installments, unless the City increases the monthly permit parking rate. The agreement continues to provide for rate increases based on the percentage of the increase over the monthly parking permit rate which can occur with 30-days’ notice to the Tenant. Either party may also terminate the agreement with 30-days’ notice consistent with the requirements and guidelines set forth in the lease agreement.”

E-9: A Resolution of the City Commission appointing Kelley Schild (Nominated by Commissioner Fors, Jr.) to serve as a member of the Senior Citizens Advisory Board, for remainder of a two (2) year term which began on June 1, 2021 and continues through May 31, 2023.

Presentation of Boards and/or Committees draft/final minutes requesting action from the City Commission

2-1: A Resolution of the Transportation Advisory Board requesting that the City Commission adopt a resolution amending Resolution No. 2015-101, passed and adopted on June 16, 2015, to incorporate the Transportation Advisory Board in the site plan review process for proposed and existing development project applications and in the review of any proposed new or changes to current legislation including the City ’s Zoning Codes, land-use designations, comprehensive plan and development overlays, which could impact transportation modalities, mobility options, or infrastructure. Any recommendations after reviews will be effectively considered by other City Boards, City Administration, and the City Commission.

“At the April 19,2022 Transportation Advisory Board meeting the below motion was made, Any and all projects scheduled to go before the Development Review Committee (DRC) will be reviewed by the Transportation Advisory Board at its meeting preceding the DRC meeting. After its review, the TAB will submit questions and comments in writing about the projects impact on public of Right of way and public transportation to be raised at DRC meeting for discussion”

2-2: A Resolution of the Historic Preservation Board requesting that the City Commission adopt a Resolution authorizing ad valorem tax relief for the property at 711 University Drive, a Local Historic Landmark, legally described as Lot 11 & S ½ of Lot 10, Block 137, Coral Gables Country Club Section Part Six, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 20, at Page 1 of the Public Records of Miami-Dade County, Florida. (Historic Preservation Board Meeting of April 20, 2021, Vote: 6-0, three members absent).

“On April 20, 2022, the Historic Preservation Board unanimously (6-0) passed a motion to recommend approval of the application as presented. This application is associated with the related Special Certificate of Appropriateness, COA (SP) 2017-006, which was granted design approval by the Historic Preservation Board on June 15, 2017.”

Ordinances On Second Reading

F-1: An Ordinance of the City Commission providing for a text amendment to the City of Coral Gables official Zoning Code by striking Appendix E “Business Improvement Overlay District (BIOD),” Section E1 “Business Improvement Overlay District (BIOD),” Subsection B(1)(D) “Temporary Window Signs/Wraps”, and creating Article 11 “Signs”, Section 11-101 “Purpose and Applicability,” Subsection C(9) “Temporary Window Wraps,” to uniformly regulate temporary window wraps within the City; providing for severability clause, repealer provision, codification, and providing for an effective date. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago). (Item F-1 and F-2 are related).

“At the January 11, 2022 Commission Meeting, the City Commission discussed the need to improve the appearance of vacant storefronts in the commercial areas of the City by is allowing unsightly window coverings. Currently, window wraps are regulated in both the City Code and the Zoning Code, which has created confusion in the application and enforcement of the City’s regulations. The City Commission desires to uniformly regulate the appearance of vacant or unoccupied storefronts, in a content-neutral manner, to improve the appearance of commercial areas in the City, reduce visual clutter, and allow for the effective communication of information. In furtherance of these goals, and in the spirit of partnership, City staff met with leadership from the Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce and the Coral Gables Business Improvement District on numerous occasions to solicit their feedback in the preparation of the ordinances. The purpose of these ordinances is to strike the portions of the City Code that regulate window wraps, eliminate window wrap provisions from the Business Improvement Overlay District and to create Zoning Code Section 11-101, Subsection C(9) “Temporary Window Wraps,” to uniformly regulate temporary window wraps within the City. The Zoning Code amendment was approved by the Planning and Zoning Board 5-0).”

F-2: An Ordinance of the City Commission amending City Code Chapter 105 “Buildings and Building Regulations”, Article II “Building Standards”, Division I “Generally”, Section 105-29 “Condition of Commercial Property” of the Code of Ordinances, striking language regarding window coverings and relocating the regulation of window wraps to the Zoning Code, providing for severability clause, repealer provision, codification, and providing for an effective date. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago). (Item F-1 and F-2 are related).

F-3: An Ordinance of the City Commission granting approval of a Planned Area Development (PAD) pursuant to Zoning Code Article 14, “Process,” Section 14-206, “General Procedures for Planned Area Development” for a multi-family project referred to as “301-341 Madeira” on the property legally described as Lots 4 thru 24, Block 1 of Revised Plat of Coral Gables Section K (341, 335, 331, 325, 321, 317, 301 Madeira Avenue), Coral Gables, Florida; including required conditions; providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, and providing for an effective date. Lobbyist: Mario Garcia-Serra. Lobbyist: John McWilliams. Lobbyist: Robert Behar, Jr. (Items F-3 and F-12 are related).

Click here to see staff’s memo.

F-4: An Ordinance of the City Commission providing for a text amendment to the City of Coral Gables Official Zoning Code by amending Article 14, “Process,” Section 14-204, “Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs)” to allow the City Commission to designate a TDR receiving site when located in a Planned Area Development (PAD) and zoned MX2 or MX3; providing for severability, repealer, codification, and an effective date.

“As requested by the City Commission, a Zoning Code text amendment is proposed to allow the City Commission to designate a Transfer of Development Rights (TDR) receiving site when located in a Planned Area Development (PAD) and zoned Mixed Use 2 (MX2) or Mixed-Use 3 (MX3). Currently there are 3 receiving sites in Coral Gables: Central Business District (CBD), North Ponce Mixed Use District Overlay, and the Design & Innovation District Overlay. The proposed text amendment would allow the City Commission to designate a TDR receiving site outside of these 3 boundaries when the site is a Planned Area Development (PAD) and zoned mixed-use (MX2 or MX3). The receiving site would be subject to the review criteria in Section 14-204.6”

Ordinances On First Reading

F-5: An Ordinance of the City Commission of the City of Coral Gables, Florida amending Chapter 105 “Buildings and Building Regulations,” Article II “Building Standards,” Division 1 “Generally,” of the City Code to create Section 105-32 “Additional Rules and Regulations for Construction Sites,” providing for severability, repealer, codification, and an effective date.

“The City Code contains certain regulations for construction staging where the construction will affect the public rights-of-way and the Development Services Department has published certain rules and regulations for construction even where it does not affect the public rights-of-way, but not all such rules and regulations have been codified in the City Code. The proposed ordinance would codify the following rules and regulations for construction sites such that failure to abide by such rules and regulations will constitute a code enforcement violation: (1) All construction sites are to be kept in a clean and sanitary manner free from all trash and debris. (2) Construction dumpsters shall not be allowed to overflow. (3) At no time shall portable toilets be placed on the public rights-of-way. All portable toilets must be placed facing toward the inside of the property and must be maintained in an odor-free condition. (4) Public rights-of-ways, including sidewalks and swales, are to be kept free from all construction materials and debris at all times.”

F-6: An Ordinance of the City Commission amending Section 2-79 of Chapter 2, Article III of the City Code, titled “Order of Business” to clarify definitions of support information, adopt an order of presentation for quasi-judicial hearings and clarify procedures for submission of evidence in quasi-judicial hearings, providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, codification, and providing for an effective date.

“The City of Coral Gables has various Code provisions which govern submission deadlines for certain agenda items. However, often times City staff or applicants wish to present demonstrative or visual aids (including PowerPoint presentations etc.) during City Commission meetings which repackage or duplicate information timely submitted. This ordinance specifically allows for such presentation and adopts procedures for quasi-judicial hearings heard by the City Commission, consistent with the Zoning Code. Those procedures include details regarding orders of presentation and deadlines for submission of evidence.”

F-7: An Ordinance of the City Commission of Coral Gables, Florida amending Chapter 62 “Streets, Sidewalks and Other Public Places”, Article IV “Maintenance of Sidewalks and Swale Areas”, Section 62-151 “Alleys, swale areas and rights-of-way to be kept clean and mowed” of the Code of Ordinances, to revise the maintenance responsibilities of property owners, providing for severability clause, repealer provision, codification, and providing for an effective date. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago).

“Recently the City has placed a renewed emphasis on improving the appearance of its commercial areas through targeted code enforcement efforts, downtown clean-up events, community education and engagement, and business incentive programs. Since August 24, 2021, the City Commission has discussed the City’s downtown cleanup efforts at City Commission Meetings on at least ten separate occasions. City staff and elected officials also participated in downtown walk-throughs and a trolley tour to assess the condition of the commercial areas of the City and to brainstorm solutions to elevate the City’s appearance. The City has sponsored four downtown clean-up events through Keep Coral Gables Beautiful, collecting over 806 pounds of litter with the help of 154 volunteers, and has also supported privately-sponsored clean-up events throughout the City. As an incentive to engage the business community in the effort to see a more beautiful downtown, the City announced the Commercial Beautification Awards on April 26, 2022, to highlight businesses that have gone above and beyond in the beautification and maintenance of their storefronts and surrounding areas. The City Code contains several sections related to property maintenance including Section 105-2, which requires that exterior building façades be clean and well maintained, including awnings, signs, windows, doors and sidewalk overhangs; Section 58-48, which requires abutting property owners to maintain sidewalks in the City as a smooth continuous surface, free from cracks and defects; Section 62-152, which requires abutting property owners or occupants to maintain unpaved areas adjacent to sidewalks in good condition, free from holes and hidden dangers; and Section 62-151, which requires owners and occupants of improved and unimproved property to maintain their property in a clean, litter-free and mowed condition, including sidewalks, grass strips, alleys, curbs, swale areas, or rights-of-way. Acknowledging that many property owners may not be aware of their maintenance responsibilities pursuant to the City Code, the City has been engaged in an ongoing education campaign to educate and inform the business community via individual meetings, the distribution of flyers, individual mailings, announcements via the City’s E-newsletter, a dedicated webpage, social media postings, and through partnership with the Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce and Coral Gables Business Improvement District. In furtherance of the City’s goal to improve the appearance of the City, particularly its commercial areas, and consistent with the City’s outreach efforts thus far, the City Commission wishes to amend Coral Gables City Code Section 62-151, to provide greater clarity as to a property owner’s maintenance responsibilities and to expressly require a deep cleaning of properties and their surrounding areas every six months, or more frequently as circumstances may necessitate.”

F-8: An Ordinance of the City Commission approving the vacation of a public alleyway pursuant to Zoning Code Article 14, “Process,” Section 14-211, “Abandonment and Vacations” and City Code Chapter 62, Article 8, “Vacation, Abandonment and Closure of Streets, Easements and Alleys by Private Owners and the City; Application Process, ” providing for the vacation of the east-west public alleyway lying between lots 1-12 and lots 35-46, Block 10, Coral Gables Crafts Section, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 10, Page 40 of the Public Records of Miami-Dade County, Florida; providing for substitute perpetual access and utility easement, setting forth terms and conditions; providing for an effective date. (LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON FILE) Alley Vacation. Lobbyist: Lily Alvarez. Lobbyist: Armando Codina. Lobbyist: Jose M. Jimenez. (Items F-8, F-9, F-10, and F-11 are related).

Click here to see staff memo.

F-9: An Ordinance of the City Commission providing for a Text Amendment to the City of Coral Gables Official Zoning Code by amending Appendix A, “Site Specific Zoning Regulations,” Section A-36, “Crafts Section,” by removing the number of stories and height limitations for the property legally described as Lots 1-12 and lots 35-46, Block 10, Coral Gables Crafts Section, Coral Gables, Florida; providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, codification, and providing for an effective date. ( LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON FILE) Text Amendment. Lobbyist: Lily Alvarez. Lobbyist: Armando Codina. Lobbyist: Jose M. Jimenez. (Items F-8, F-9, F-10, and F-11 are related).

Click here to see staff memo.

F-10: An Ordinance of the City Commission granting approval of a Planned Area Development (PAD) pursuant to Zoning Code Article 14, “Process,” Section 14-206, “General Procedures for Planned Area Development” for a mixed-use project referred to as “Regency Tower” on property legally described as Lots 1-12 and lots 35-46 including the public alleyway lying in between, Block 10, and lots 1-4, Block 15, Coral Gables Crafts Section (290, 272, 250, 244 Valencia Avenue, 247, 297 Almeria Avenue, and 2701 Salzedo Street) Coral Gables, Florida; including required conditions; providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, and providing for an effective date. ( LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON FILE) PAD. Lobbyist: Lily Alvarez. Lobbyist: Armando Codina. Lobbyist: Jose M. Jimenez. (Items F-8, F-9, F-10, and F-11 are related).

Click here to see staff memo.

Resolutions

F-11: A Resolution of the City Commission granting approval for Conditional Use Mixed-Use Site Plan pursuant to Zoning Code Section 2-200 “Mixed Use Districts” for a mixed-use project referred to as “Regency Towers” on property legally described as Lots 1-12 and lots 35-46 including the public alleyway lying in between, Block 10, and lots 1-4, Block 15, Coral Gables Crafts Section (290, 272, 250, 244 Valencia Avenue, 247, 297 Almeria Avenue, and 2701 Salzedo Street) Coral Gables, Florida; including required conditions; providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, and providing for an effective date. (LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON FILE) Conditional Use Site Plan. Lobbyist: Lily Alvarez. Lobbyist: Armando Codina. Lobbyist: Jose M. Jimenez. (This Resolution is not for consideration at this time and will be included with the above ordinance on Second Reading if approved on First Reading. (Items F-8, F-9, F-10, and F-11 are related).

Click here to see staff memo.

F-12: A Resolution of the City Commission granting Conditional Use approval pursuant to Zoning Code Section 2-400, “District Overlays,” Section 2-405, “Residential Infill Regulations (RIR),” for a multi-family project referred to as “301-341 Madeira” located on property zoned Multi-Family 2 (MF2) legally described as Lots 4 thru 24, Block 1 of Revised Plat of Coral Gables Section K (341, 335, 331, 325, 321, 317, 301 Madeira Avenue), Coral Gables, Florida; including required conditions; providing for a repealer provision, severability clause, and providing for an effective date. Lobbyist: Mario Garcia-Serra. Lobbyist: John McWilliams. Lobbyist: Robert Behar, Jr.

F-13: A Resolution of the City Commission approving the petition language for the renaming of streets located within the Pine Bay Estates Special Taxing District.

“On April 12, 2022, the Pine Bay Estates Homeowners Association submitted a letter of intent with over 20% of the homeowners support seeking to rename the streets within the Pine Bay Estates Special Taxing District. Despite the fact that this neighborhood has been in the City for a significant period of time, Miami-Dade County addresses have remained in place. This request does NOT seek an amendment to the District and solely seeks to determine the level of support in the community for street renaming. The Special Taxing District Amendment process is being used as a guideline since the District and the renaming area share the same boundaries. If the petition language is approved, the petition will be provided to the petitioner for distribution to all properties within the district. The petitioner will have four (4) months to complete and return the petition unless extended by the City Commission. Currently there is no expected cost to the Special Taxing District. If the renaming is approved, the City, during the normal course of business, will remove existing signs and install the approved signage.”

City Commission Items

G-1: A Resolution of the City Commission naming the City-Funded Swim Lesson Scholarship Program at Venetian Pool in honor of Sonia Dallas.

“The Community and Recreation Department provides a match of ten scholarships to the Venetian Aquatic Club’s Scholarship program each year to provide free swim lessons to those most impacted by financial hardships and to ensure that an essential life skill such as learning how to swim and to be safe around the water is available to those who are unable to afford swim lessons. It is the recommendation of the Community Recreation Department, following extensive community testimonials, to formally name the City funded scholarships after Sonia Dallas. Dallas went above and beyond in service to the City, Club and community, and volunteered countless hours of her time as the Club’s Water Safety Chair from 1985 to 2021, when she passed. Dallas was an inspiration to her fellow club members and water safety instructors and had a direct impact on multiple generations of children and adults who learned both how to swim and how to teach swim lessons to impact future generations. Dallas served during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and worked each day throughout the summer, even while her health was in rapid decline. Her presence will be strongly missed but her impact has left an impression on multiple lives and future generations.”

G-2: A discussion regarding outdoor dining in Coral Gables. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago). (Items G-2 and I-2 are related).

G-3: Discussion regarding temporary dog park at Ponce de Leon Boulevard and Mendoza Avenue. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson).

G-4: Creation of temporary “pop-up” area in the northern portion of Catalonia Park to be used exclusively for dogs until proposed dog facility at Salvadore Park is completed.” (Sponsored by Commissioner Menendez).

G-5: Discussion regarding commercial waste in residential areas. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson).

G-6: Discussion regarding connection to downtown bicycles. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago). (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson).

G-7: A discussion regarding quarterly reports on the condition of city buildings. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago).

G-8: Update on the cardboard recycling initiative and additional Code Enforcement efforts and educational campaign. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago).

G-9: Discussion regarding scooters. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson).

G-10: A Resolution of the City Commission of the City of Coral Gables, Florida authorizing Neighborhood Safety Aides to continue assisting with code enforcement matters. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago).

“The Neighborhood Safety Aide (“NSA”) Program was established by the Coral Gables Police Department (“CGPD”) in 2016 to further promote safety in residential neighborhoods and commercial districts and to foster a positive working relationship between the community and the Police Department. The NSAs provide increased visibility, promote safety, and serve as additional “eyes and ears” in the community and are equipped with radios to communicate with CGPD. CGPD Standard Operating Procedure #127 for Neighborhood Team Policing Unit provides that the responsibilities and duties of the NSAs include, among other things:
Understanding community problems and effectively engaging to solve them. Assisting in accomplishing other needs of the CGPD. While the City Commission wants to continue to encourage the positive relationships that the NSAs have developed with residents and businesses and thus, does not want them to issue citations for code enforcement violations, the NSAs are often the first observers of code enforcement violations, and their assistance has been valuable to Code Enforcement. The City Commission recognizes the value of and wishes to further prioritize that the NSAs assist with code enforcement matters by reporting violations for appropriate enforcement by Code Enforcement and/or Police. The proposed resolution formally directs the City Manager to continue to authorize the NSAs to assist with code enforcement matters by reporting violations they may observe, in a manner directed by the City Manager and for appropriate enforcement by Code Enforcement and/or Police. This item was deferred at the May 10, 2022 Commission meeting.”

G-11: A Resolution of the City Commission approving an updated “swale package” outlining various options for swale planting and setting forth the required permits and procedures for planting on City swales (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson).

“In Resolution 2016-175 the City Commission authorized the Public Works Department to proceed with the implementation of a permit process to allow decorative crushed stone and low, non-woody landscape plants, commonly referred to as the “swale package,” in the public right-of-way. The City wishes to adopt a new “swale package” outlining additional plants appropriate for planting in City right-of-way with appropriate permitting and documentation. This updated Swale Package suggests various native and non-native plants appropriate for plantings in City rights-of-way.”

G-12: A Resolution of the City Commission directing staff to reconvene the school safety task force and work with the schools in the City to reassess and review ongoing safety measures and update the best practices manual as needed. (Sponsored by Commissioner Fors).

“On March 28th, 2018, the City Commission adopted Resolution 2018-96 directing City staff to visit private charter schools in the area and assess their safety measures. The City created a Coral Gables Private School “Task Force”, as Miami-Dade County Public Schools were outside of our jurisdiction, to analyze, prepare, and develop a Best Practices Manual with the goal
of enhancing private school and community safety within Coral Gables. It has been over 4 years since the original Task Force was convened and given the changing security needs of our community and the City Commission’s continued commitment to the safety of our youth,
the City Commission desires to reconvene the Task Force to evaluate the changes implemented in 2018 and determine what changes can be implemented to further strengthen the security measures in our schools.”

City Manager Items

I-1: End of Session Report from the City’s Lobbying Team.

I-2: A Resolution of the City Commission extending through August 30, 2022 the authority granted to the City Manager to relax current standards for outdoor /open-air dining and signage in order to provide for expanded outdoor seating opportunities to assist with social distancing at restaurants and suspending all applicable fees. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago) (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson). (Items G-2 and I-2 are related).

“In order to provide for expanded economic opportunities to establishments affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, while complying with social distancing measures, on May 26, 2020, the City Commission adopted Resolution No. 2020-119 which authorized the City Manager to provide expanded outdoor seating opportunities in the right-of-way, on private property, and on city-owned properties by relaxing the requirements in Appendix E, Section E.1(B)(4)1 and 3-3152 of the Zoning Code relating to outdoor dining/open-air dining requirements; to waive all fees applicable to outdoor dining/open-air dining permits; to provide for expedited permitting; to temporarily close streets, subject to County approval, if required, to provide restaurants with additional outdoor dining opportunities; and to relax applicable standards relating to signage. The City Manager was granted such authority through January 15, 2021, which was further extended through June 15, 2021 by Resolution 2020-266, to January 15, 2022 by Resolution No. 2021-76 and to May 31, 2022 by Resolution No. 2022-14. The City Commission acknowledges that the expansion of such authority has been a successful measure to allow establishments to maximize their ability to serve patrons outdoors and that the expanded opportunities have been well-received in the community. As such, the City Commission wishes to extend the deadline set forth in Resolution No. 2022-14 through August 30, 2022.”

I-3: Innovation and Technology presentation: Research collaboration with the Department of Energy and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on advanced traffic data analysis and applied artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Click here to see staff’s presentation.

I-4: Update regarding the Miami-Dade County’s Rapid Transit Zone Ordinance.

I-5: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing an encumbrance in the amount of $400,000 from Federal Forfeited Asset Fund (F.A.F.) moneys for a matching contribution required as part of a federal grant program; the initiation of a body worn camera program by the Coral Gables Police Department; and authorizing an amendment to the Fiscal Year 2021-2022 annual budget to recognize the transfer from reserve of Federal Forfeiture Funds as revenue and appropriating such funds to put toward the cost of the items described above.

I-6: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing the execution of a ten (10) year agreement with Miami-Dade County for the billing and collection of sanitary sewer and stormwater utility services charges on behalf of the City of Coral Gables.

“On February 23, 2012, Miami-Dade County (MDC) and the City of Coral Gables (City) entered into a 10-year agreement providing for the billing and collection of sanitary sewage and stormwater utility service charges by MDC for the City. Under this agreement, MDC billed and collected the City’s sanitary sewer and stormwater utility service charges simultaneously with the issuance and collection of MDC’s bills for water service. MDC and the City desire to enter into a new ten (10) year contract allowing MDC to continue the administration, billing and collection of sanitary sewer and stormwater utility service charges on behalf of the City. This contract for services with a government entity is exempt from the Procurement Code under Sec. 2-607(25). Under this new agreement, MDC will limit annual rate increases to a maximum of 5% per year, until their rates billed are equal to their prior year cost of providing service. Currently, MDC bills the City $3.43 per bill for all accounts billed for the City’s sanitary sewer charges plus $0.76 per bill for stormwater billing on the same invoice for a total of $4.19 per bill. The total cost of sanitary sewer billing for FY 2021-2022 is expected to be $86,000 and stormwater billing is expected to cost an additional $68,000, for a total annual cost of $154,000 for the current fiscal year. Funding for the billing of sanitary sewer and stormwater utility service charges is provided by the City’s sanitary sewer and stormwater utility billing revenue. In FY 2020-2021, MDC billed and collected $10,147,975.03 in sanitary sewer revenue, on behalf of the City, at a cost to the City of $81,347.79 and $6,395,304.03 in stormwater revenue at a cost of $64,285.80 for a total annual cost of $145,633.59.”

I-7: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to the provision of street lighting services, facilities, and programs within the Cocoplum Phase I Street Lighting Special Taxing District; amending and restating Resolution No. 2021-160; estimating the cost of street lighting services, facilities, and programs to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; determining that certain real property will be specially benefitted thereby; establishing the method of assessing the street lighting service cost against the real property that will be specially benefitted thereby; directing the finance director to prepare or direct the preparation of a preliminary assessment roll based upon the methodology set forth herein; establishing a public hearing to consider imposition of the proposed street lighting assessments and the method of their collection and directing the provision of notice in connection therewith; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 2020, Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 20-114 to create the Cocoplum Phase I Street Lighting Special Taxing District to provide street lighting services, facilities, and programs within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City shall be responsible for “establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District.” As originally created, the proposed apportionment methodology was established on a front footage basis. In 2021, the property owners within the District voted to change both the level of service and the method of apportionment from a front footage basis to a per Lot approach. These changes were approved by the City Commission with the adoption of Ordinance No. 2021-27. Due to these pending changes, no assessment rates were imposed within the District in 2021. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), the initial step for the City to establish assessment rates and provide for collection of assessments for the District pursuant to the revised apportionment method and level of service is the adoption of this Amended and Restated Initial Assessment Resolution. This resolution sets the Street Lighting Service Cost at $131,700 for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022. The proposed maximum annual assessment is estimated to be $878.00 per Lot/Unit.”

I-8: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Cocoplum Phase I Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1995 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 95-214 to create the Cocoplum, Phase I Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-194) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-245) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology. There is a decrease in the proposed rates due to excess reserves. Any Budget deficits will be funded with available surplus reserves. The FY2022 assessment is $3,100.00 per improved unit or $1,550.00 for vacant units.”

I-9: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Kings Bay Amended Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 2004 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 04-52 to create the Kings Bay Amended Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-198) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-249) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment is $1,971.44 per improved unit or $985.72 for vacant units.”

I-10: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Pine Bay Estates Security Guard Special Taxing District; amending the definition of security services; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1993 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 93-66 to create the Pine Bay Estates Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-202) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-251) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment is $2,755.28 per improved unit and $1,377.64 for vacant units.”

I-11: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Snapper Creek Lakes Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1996 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 96-48 to create the Snapper Creek Lakes Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-200) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-252) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment is $2,388.28 per improved unit or $1,194.14 for vacant units.”

I-12: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Old Cutler Bay Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1993 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 93-20 to create the Old Cutler Bay Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-199) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-250) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. Any Budget deficits will be funded with available surplus reserves. The FY2022 assessment is $4,391.22 per improved unit or $2,195.61 for vacant units.”

I-13: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Sunrise Harbour Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1996 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 96-56 to create the Sunrise Harbour Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-201) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-253) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. Any Budget deficits will be funded with available surplus reserves. The FY2022 assessment is $3,034.54 per improved unit or $1,517.27 for vacant units.”

I-14: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to Security Services Assessments within the Banyan Drive Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 2018 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 18-110 to create the Banyan Drive Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective June 1, 2019. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2019-195) on June 11, 2019, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2019-273) was adopted on September 12, 2019. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. Any Budget deficits will be funded with available surplus reserves. The FY 2022 assessment is $4,700.00 per improved unit and $2,350.00 for vacant units.”

I-15: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Hammock Lakes Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 2009 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 09-63 to create the Hammock Lakes Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-196) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-247) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment is $3,968.61 per improved Lot/Unit and $1,984.31 per vacant lot/units or units with external access.”

I-16: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Hammock Lake Banyan Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1995 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 95-75 to create the Hammock Lake Banyan Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-195) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-246) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment rate is $1,482.00 per improved Lot/Unit and $741.00 per Vacant Lot/Unit.”

I-17: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to security services assessments within the Hammock Oaks Harbor Security Guard Special Taxing District; estimating the cost of the security services to be assessed for the fiscal year commencing October 1, 2022; directing the finance director to prepare an updated security services assessment roll; establishing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice in connection thereof; providing for severability; and providing an effective date.

“In accordance with the Dade County Home Rule Charter and Chapter 18 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, in 1985 Dade County (the “County”) enacted Ordinance No. 85-95 to create the Hammock Oaks Harbor Security Guard Special Taxing District to provide enhanced security services to properties within the District. Pursuant to Section 18-3.1 of the Code of Metropolitan Dade County, after approval by referendum and a joint resolution of the County and City of Coral Gables, governance and control of the District was transferred from the County to the City effective on October 1, 2018. Pursuant to the interlocal agreement between the County and the City outlining the transfer of governance, the City is responsible for establishing assessment rates and collecting assessments for the Special Taxing District. Pursuant to this agreement, the City adopted the Initial Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-197) on July 10, 2018, and the Final Assessment Resolution (Resolution Number 2018-248) was adopted on September 13, 2018. Pursuant to the Master Assessment Ordinance (No. 2015-09), this resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. There is no change in the proposed methodology or proposed assessment rates. The FY2022 assessment is $2,698.80 per improved unit or $1,349.40 for vacant units.”

I-18: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to the provision of Fire Protection Services, Facilities and Programs in the City of Coral Gables, Florida; establishing the estimated assessment rate for fire protection assessments for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022; directing the preparation of an assessment roll; authorizing a public hearing and directing the provision of notice thereof; and providing an effective date.

“Resolution Number 2009-231, Initial Assessment Resolution, was adopted August 25, 2009, and Resolution Number 2009-267, Final Assessment, was adopted September 22, 2009. Ordinance Number 2009-37 was adopted August 25, 2009 authorizing the imposition and collection of fire protection assessments against property, but was replaced with the Master Service Assessment Ordinance in 2015 (No. 2015-09). This resolution initiates the annual process for updating the Assessment Roll, sets the proposed Fire Protection Assessments rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2021, calls for the public hearing on these rates, and directs the provision of notice. The proposed Fire Protection Assessment rates and exemptions for the upcoming fiscal year are not requested to be changed. The City shall provide fire protection service to assessed properties located within the City upon the imposition of Fire Protection Assessment, which shall be imposed against all Tax Parcels within the Property Use Categories set forth in this Preliminary Rate Resolution. There are no changes in the proposed Fire Protection Assessment rates for the fiscal year beginning October 1, 2022.”

I-19: A Resolution of the City Commission relating to the collection and disposal of solid waste in the City of Coral Gables, Florida; determining the Solid Waste Cost and the Solid Waste Service Assessments for the Fiscal Year beginning October 1, 2022; directing the preparation of an Assessment Roll; authorizing a Public Hearing and directing the provision of notice thereof; and providing an effective date.

Click here to see staff’s memo.

I-20: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing La Jamoteca, located at 359 Miracle Mile to add the sale of alcoholic beverages for consumption on premises as an accessory use to the retail of gourmet food, as permitted by state law, provided that total receipts from the sale of alcoholic beverages not exceed 25 percent of the total annual gross receipts, and permanent bars or counters not exceed 45 square feet in surface area, subject to a valid certificate of use and local business tax; and providing for an effective date.

“La Jamoteca, located at 359 Miracle Mile has requested the ability to sell beer and wine for consumption on premises (2COP) as incidental to the primary function of its retail business (a non-restaurant facility), which is focused on gourmet food, SpanisWEuropean style ham, charcuterie, cheese, and wine. Per Section 6-4(a)(4) of the City Code, a non-restaurant facility must receive approval from the City Commission after administrative review from the City Manager and meet the requirements set forth in the City Code: (1) That the non-restaurant facility shall have a valid certificate of use and occupational license. (2) The sale of alcoholic beverages and intoxicating liquors shall be only incidental to the primary function of the facility. (3) Permanent bars or counters with a surface area not exceeding 45 square feet shall be permitted. (4) Total receipts from the sale of alcoholic beverages and intoxicating liquors shall not exceed 25 percent of the total annual gross receipts of any non-restaurant facility. It shall be the responsibility of the non-restaurant facility to maintain records open for inspection by the city to demonstrate compliance with this requirement. (5) Non-restaurant facilities holding a state retail beverage or retail liquor store license shall always be subject to inspection by the city manager or his or her designee for the purpose of determining that such non-restaurant facilities are in compliance with the existing requirements. Staff has reviewed the application and it complies with the requirements of the code. In order to obtain license from the state to be able to sell beer and wine for consumption on premise (2COP), the Applicant is requesting approval from the City Commission.”

I-21: Update regarding Country Club improvements.

City Clerk Items

K-1: A Resolution of the City Commission supporting the continued existence of the Business Improvement District of Coral Gables.

“On April 15, 1997, pursuant to Resolution No. 29339, the City of Coral Gables created the Business Improvement District (“BID”), which is the marketing, advocacy and promotion specialist for Miracle Mile and Downtown Coral Gables. The BID has been a stalwart partner to the City since its creation and an advocate on behalf of its members and Downtown Coral Gables for the past twenty (20) years. Said businesses received the special benefits conferred on commercial businesses which are within the BID boundaries, and as such said business should be subject to the assessment. The Coral Gables City Commission has approved a petitioning process or electronic voting method wherein the business owners shall be called upon to decide whether to re-establish the BID for a term of an additional (5) five years using a method of calculating the special assessments levied and collected in the Business Improvement District based on ground floor square footage. The City believes it to be in the best interest of both residents and businesses, as well as visitors and future visitors, for the BID to be re-established. The City Commission does hereby instruct City Staff to file a petition or cast an electronic vote for all of its City-owned downtown properties that exist within the BID boundaries to support the continued existence of the Business Improvement District (“BID”).”

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2 thoughts on “Agenda Digest: City Commission (5/31/2022)

  1. Thank you for your invaluable help to Coral Gables. I will continue to bring Gables Insider to the attention of the Pulitzer Prize organization, as there is no doubt in my mind you deserve a Pulitzer Prize.

    Sincerely,

    Jackson Rip Holmes

  2. Regarding G-11, Swale Package

    The problem: no grass at swales is caused by Trees & Cars/ People. In reality, People. Dumb people who planted trees, such as Ficus or Black Olives which grow ENORMOUSLY, too close together! Case in point: Columbus BLVD from the Golf course towards the Biltmore. The Street was attractive 20/30 years ago when I’d cycle to the Biltmore, but not anymore. Don’t plant trees 30 or 40 feet apart but 50 or 60. Don’t let people turn garages/ carports into living space, because we’ll get cars parked on the swale. Please trim Trees on swale more vigorously. Bring them down in height; the taller branches are a nuisance when the hurricanes blow. The people who want swale packages are lazy/ don’t want to be moving cars from driveways & probably have their garages filled with boxes, or an illegal efficiency where the garage is supposed to be. They want to park under the shady trees because they’re too lazy & cheap to trim the branches, or buy a visor, or clear out/ organize the garage.

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