Agenda Digest: Commission Meeting (7/13/2021)

Ariel Fernandez

Founder & Editor
[email protected]


On July 13, 2021, the Coral Gables City Commission will hold its first evening meeting at 4:00PM. Here are some of the more notable items on the agenda for this upcoming meeting. Click here to see the full agenda.

Non-credited quotes in this article are excerpts from the memos presented to the Commission explaining the items.

Consent Agenda

E-1: A Resolution of the City Commission approving a Memorandum of Understanding between the City of Miami Fire Department and the City of Coral Gables Fire Department.

“The purpose of this MOU is to maintain cooperative and collaborative relationships with partner agencies within the region that will increase capabilities in identifying and responding to Radiological and Nuclear (“R/N”) threats. These efforts will require close collaboration, support and partnerships from all participants that ultimately will enhance the STC Program to the benefit of every organization/agency within the region.”

E-2 to E-8 and E-10 are appointments of residents to City Advisory Boards.

E-9: A Resolution of the City Commission authorizing a Second Amendment to Lease with Miami Office 2, LLC, with regard to the premises located at 2121 Ponce de Leon Boulevard, Suite 720, Coral Gables, Florida 33134, the City’s Economic Development Department’s offices, extending the Lease Term for a period of ninety (90) days until November 30, 2021.

“The Lease had a 65-month lease term which expired May 30, 2021. Pursuant to the Lease, the Tenant paid $5,257.02 per month for base rent and $414.32 per month for Tenant’s share of common area operating expenses, for a total of $5,672.34 per month. On, April 9, 2021, Tenant and Landlord entered into a First Amendment to Lease to extend the lease term for an additional ninety (90) days until August 31, 2021 at a total monthly rent rate of $5,857.72 per month. Tenant and Landlord desire to enter into a Second amendment to Lease to extend the lease term for an additional ninety (90) days until November 30, 2021, while the City completes the renovations of the H. George Fink Studio where the Economic Development Department’s Offices will be located. The proposed extended lease terms are as follows: Extension of Term: September 1, 2021- November 30, 2021. Total Monthly Rent: $5,857.72 per month. Tenant’s Share of Common Area Operating Expenses: During the Extended Term, Tenant shall have no obligation to pay Tenant’s share of common area operating expenses.”

E-11: A Resolution of the City Commission accepting the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, Compliance Reports, and Management Letter, for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2021 by RSM US LLP, Certified Public Accountants.

RSM US LLP submitted it’s Independent Auditor’s Report on the City’s 2019-2020 Budget. Click here to see their full report.

Boards & Committees

Items 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 are time certain items, scheduled for 5:30PM.

2.1: A Resolution of the Coral Gables Transportation Advisory Board requesting that the City Commission direct City staff to take the next steps to move forward with the South Alhambra Circle bikeway plan and conduct community meeting with the area’s residents.

The minutes of the March 16th Transportation Advisory Board explains as follows “The chairman introduced Ms. Roberta Neway to speak who spoke about the South Alhambra Circle bike lane project. She informed the board that City staff met with the owners of 29 homes in her neighborhood and only 3 opposed the idea. The project would provide a direct path to the Metrorail, University of Miami and the Underline. She stated that there are people that have agreed that the idea should go to the Commission so they can direct staff to present a plan to the residents.”

As previously reported on Gables Insider, the issue has been controversial north of US1 and residents on Alhambra had been adamant about bike lanes not being placed on Alhambra, which brought the Commission to previously end the project in January of 2020.

2.2: A Resolution of the Coral Gables Transportation Advisory Board requesting that the City Commission direct City Staff to assess and take necessary action to address the missing sidewalk segments of the circuit between Riviera Drive and Granada Boulevard, South of Hardee Road, as well as other areas in the City and provide a report on how it will be addressed.

“At the April 20th Transportation Advisory Board meeting, Mr. Kevin Moure presented a comprehensive summary of the missing sidewalk segments of the sidewalk circuit between Riviera Drive and Granada Boulevard south of Hardee Road. The missing segments are part of a pedestrian and bicycle route that is used frequently by families and elderly people in the area. Completing the circuit would decrease the safety risks to pedestrians and cyclists, prevent vehicular traffic interruptions due street crossings and encourage more active living and active transportation. The Transportation Advisory Board believes that this small project of narrow scope highlights safety concerns and should serve as demonstration project for the City to use and further investigate other segments where sidewalks are missing and need to be constructed.”

2.3: A Resolution of the Coral Gables Transportation Advisory Board requesting that the City Commission oppose any proposal by any outside agency that would allow golf carts and/or other motorized vehicles on any shared use path that is designated for the use of pedestrians and cyclists.

“At the April 20, 2021 Transportation Advisory Board meeting, Ms. Sue Kawalerski informed the Board that the Village of Palmetto Bay has adopted a resolution requesting approval from Miami-Dade County for the use of golf carts on Old Cutler Road and the shared use path. Deborah Swain presented a motion of the TAB requesting for the City of Coral Gables Commission to oppose any proposal by any outside agency that would allow golf carts and/or other motorized vehicles on any shared use path that is designated for the use of pedestrians and cyclists. The motion was seconded by Sue Kawalerski, voted upon, and adopted unanimously by the board.”

2.4: A Resolution of the School Community Relations Committee urging the City Commission to support the expansion of School Board Regions within Miami-Dade County.

“On January 15, 2021 and May 21, 2021, the School Community Relations Committee (“SCRC”) discussed School Board Item H-8 entitled “Additional Support to Miami-Dade County Public Schools Regional Centers” from the School Board Meeting of January 13, 2021, sponsored by District Six School Board Member Maria Teresa Rojas. Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) are currently decentralized with three (3) Regional Centers, each headed by a Region Superintendent and Region Directors reporting to each Region Superintendent. With all the different responsibilities assigned to a Region Director, it may be extremely challenging for him or her to be able to visit schools on a regular basis and provide adequate support and supervision to the schools and principals within his or her region. Due to the concerns outlined in this resolution and further discussed in School Board Item H-8 (attached hereto), the SCRC urges the City Commission to support the expansion of school board regions within Miami-Dade County.”

Ordinances On Second Reading

Items F-1 and G-5 are time certain items, scheduled for 6:30PM.

F-1: An Ordinance of the City Commission of the City of Coral Gables, Florida, amending Chapter 34-Nuisances, Article VI “Noise,” Section 34-170 “Exemptions” of the City Code to create an exemption for outdoor live amplified music on private property in the Central Business District, subject to approval of a permit and conditions. (Sponsored by Vice Mayor Mena)

Another issue that was greeted without resident support, this item comes up for a second reading. Noise has been an issue for residents who reside in buildings in downtown Coral Gables before, this move would only exacerbate the issue for residents.

“The proposed ordinance creates an additional exemption to the City’s noise ordinance, such that outdoor live amplified music on private property in the Central Business District shall be allowed, if the establishment has an active outdoor dining permit and, subject to a permit approved by the City Manager or his or her designee and certain additional conditions, including hours of operation and maximum sound levels.”

F-2: An Ordinance of the City Commission amending the Pine Bay Estates Security Guard Special Taxing District, as created by Miami-Dade County pursuant to County Ordinance 93-66, to increase the available hours of roving patrol and provide maintenance and landscaping services to the district; providing for a severability clause, repealer provision, codification, and providing for an effective date.

“On January 26, 2021, the City of Coral Gables received a letter of intent from over 20% of the homeowners (the ‘Petitioners’) within the Pine Bay Estates Special Taxing District (‘Pine Bay’) requesting a modification to Pine Bay to expand the services in the District to allow for additional security guard hours on an as need basis and maintenance of the entrance features and common areas located around the District. A was petition has been created and approved by the City Commission pursuant to Resolution 2021-63 on March 23, 2021. The Petitioners, in accordance with the Special Taxing District Amendment process as adopted by the City, have circulated the provided petition to all of the homeowners within Pine Bay and have acquired the signatures of 59 out of 77 homeowners (76.6%), which pursuant to the City’s Special Taxing District Amendment process allows for the requested amendment to be brought before the City Commission for approval and adoption.”

Ordinances On First Reading

Items F-3 and F-4 are time certain items, scheduled for 6:00PM.

F-3: An Ordinance of the City Commission amending the City of Coral Gables Ethics Code to add Section 2-307, “Prohibition on Campaign/Political Consultants Lobbying”. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

“In the City’s consistent stride toward serving as an example of ethical and transparent government, this Ordinance prohibits campaign/political consultants from lobbying the City Commission, as a whole, or the elected official for whom the consultant provided services, for 12 months following the last election cycle/swearing in of that particular elected official. The Ordinance is retroactive to the April 2021 election cycle thereby applying the prohibition to campaign/political consultants that worked on campaigns during that cycle.”

F-4: An Ordinance of the City Commission amending Section 2-305, “Lobbying,” of the City of Coral Gables Ethics Code to make it consistent with amendments to the Miami-Dade County Lobbying Ordinance and adding a “Duty to Announce” requirement. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

“This Ordinance amends the City’s lobbying regulations to be consistent with the proposed amendments (adopted on first reading) to the Miami-Dade lobbying regulations and to ensure that all City regulations that differ, are more stringent than those imposed by Miami-Dade County. Specifically, this Ordinance makes the following changes: Amends the definition of city personnel; Adds a definition for encourage; Amends the definition of expenditure; Amends the definition of lobbyist; Adds a definition for lobbying activity; Amends the definition of principal; Adds a definition for procurement matter; Amends the registration requirement section, to wit: that a principal must acknowledge that a particular lobbyist is authorized to represent the principal, adds time frames for certain requirements, amends the fee waiver provision, and strikes the procurement provision (as it is addressed later); Amends the contingency fee section to read consistently with the new definitions; Amends the exceptions to registration section to be consistent with the County’s and adds a subsection relating to procurement matters, specifically; Adds a “duty to announce” requirement; Amends the reporting requirements section, to wit: changes the deadline for expenditure statements to be consistent with the County’s, specifies requirements for expenditure statements, City Commission Agenda Cover Memo July 13, 2021 and adds particular requirements that must be complied with by the City Clerk to be consistent with the County’s; and Adds a “diligence requirement” that must be complied with by elected officials, appointed officials, and city employees. The Miami-Dade Ethics Code requires that all lobbyist complete mandatory ethics training within 60 days of registering, provided by the Miami-Dade Ethics Commission. However, the Code allows for municipalities to opt out of this requirement. Direction is needed regarding whether the City Commission wishes to impose the training registration on those who register to lobby in the City.”

F-5: An Ordinance of the City Commission of Coral Gables, Florida, providing for text amendments to the City of Coral Gables Official Zoning Code, Article 9, “Art In Public Spaces”, Section 9-106 to redefine “Extraordinary Maintenance” (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson and Mayor Lago)

“Coral Gables has a proud history of incorporating public art in the landscape of the City to create both function and beauty including numerous fountains and plazas which have been designated as local historic landmarks. The City is responsible for the maintenance of these art installations and believes it would beneficial to allow for the continued and expanded maintenance and repairs of the art in public spaces through the existing Art in Public Spaces fund.”

F-6: An Ordinance amending Chapter 46 of the “Code of the City of Coral Gables,” entitled “Pensions,” Implementing Provisions of the 2020-2023 Collective Bargaining Agreement between the City and the Fraternal Order of Police (“FOP”); amending Section 46-26, Compulsory Participation; amending Section 46-27, purchase of credited service for period of military service and/or employment with other public employers; amending Section 46-253, Normal Retirement Income; amending Section 46-262, Limitation On Payment of Retirement Income; amending Section 46-269, Deferred Retirement Option Plan.

“This Ordinance implements the following pension changes contained in the recently ratified 2020-2023 collective bargaining agreement between the City and Fraternal Order of Police, Lodge No. 7. The maximum participation in the DROP is extended to 96 months. If employees remain employed by the City during their 8th year in the DROP, they will be assigned to road patrol unless otherwise directed by the Police Chief in his sole discretion. Effective October 1, 2022, the maximum amount of the annual normal retirement benefit based on the normal annuity form (life with 10 year certain) payable at retirement shall be the lesser of $98,838 or 75% of the employee’s average final compensation. Employees hired after the ratification date of this agreement who retired from other police agencies and are hired by the City as full-time police officers will have the option to participate in the Retirement System or a Defined Contribution Plan. Employees retired from the City’s police department who are hired as full-time police officers will only have the option to participate in the Defined Contribution Plan. If the employee participates in a Defined Contribution Plan established by the City, the City will contribute 7% of the employee’s base pay. The pension buy back formula for those employees hired prior to October 1, 2019, who had prior military or other public employer service, but were not eligible to purchase their prior service as of October 1, 2019 because they had not completed the requisite five (5) years of service with the City to be eligible to do so, shall be 18% of the employee’s pensionable earning during their 1st year of service multiplied by the number of years being purchased. Due to the timing of the collective bargaining agreement, it is necessary that this Ordinance be adopted as an emergency, waiving 2nd reading, by 4/5th vote.”

F-7: An Ordinance of the City Commission of the City of Coral Gables, Florida, amending section 101-143(3) “Mitigation of recorded fines” of the City Code to expressly add that a factor to be considered by the City Attorney or designee in mitigating Code Enforcement fines is the number of days during which the City was reviewing submissions for permits or other development approvals. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

“City Code Sec. 101-143(3) provides that the City Attorney or his or her designee may enter into settlement and fine reduction agreements on behalf of the city. Sec. 101-143(3) includes certain factors to be considered in mitigating, reducing, or eliminating the fine. Even though it is not one of the express factors listed in Sec. 101-143(3), historically, the City Attorney’s Office, in attempting to settle matters involving outstanding code enforcement fines, has taken into account any delays in achieving compliance that are attributable to the time taken by the City to review submissions for permits or other developmental approvals. The proposed ordinance would expressly include such time for review by the City as a factor to be considered by the City Attorney or his or her designee in entering into settlement or fine reduction agreements involve outstanding code enforcement fines.”

Resolutions

F-8: A Resolution of the City Commission of Coral Gables, Florida issuing a Zoning in Progress, in accordance with Article 14 “Process,” Section 14-209, “Moratorium,” Section 14.209.3, “Zoning in Progress Request” and 14-209.4 “City Commission zoning in progress resolution review and decision,” for the consideration of Zoning Code text amendments to address the incentives and/or bonuses provided in Section 5-200 of the Zoning Code “Mediterranean Standards,” for new commercial, mixed-use, and multi-family projects; providing that projects that received final approval by the Board of Architects shall not be subject to the Zoning in Progress. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

Last month, the City held a workshop to address over-development. Just two weeks ago, a resident petition was circulated to ask the Commission for a moratorium on development and a formal review of the approval process. At this Commission meeting, Commissioner Anderson is seeking to begin addressing some of these concerns directly with a Zoning in Progress.

“This Zoning in Progress has been requested to address the bonuses and/or incentives set forth in Section 5-200 of the Zoning Code, as applied to new commercial, mixed use, and multi-family projects. The proposed Zoning in Progress Resolution would apply to any requests or applications for permits, site plan approvals, or any other official action of the City of Coral Gables permitting or having the effect of allowing incentives and/or bonuses pursuant to Section 5-200 of the Zoning Code for new commercial, mixed-use, and multi-family projects. To the extent such a request or application is submitted, the City staff would be authorized to take action to reject such application during the term of
the Zoning in Progress. The Zoning in Progress shall not apply to projects that have already received final approval by the Board of Architects by July 13, 2021 and are not seeking any changes to the applicable zoning or land use designations. The Zoning in Progress shall expire on the date of the first regularly scheduled City Commission meeting after 120 days from the effective date of this resolution, unless extended in accordance with applicable law.”

City Commission Items

G-1: A special appearance by Senator Ileana Garcia which will include a legislative update and presentation of project improvement funds to the City of Coral Gables. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

G-2: A Resolution of the City Commission re-adopting the City’s Civility Code, establishing a Civility Code for members of the City Commission and for City Employees. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

“In order to ensure that all members of the public, all members of the City Commission, and all City employees comport themselves in the most appropriate and respectful manner, the City Commission seeks to re-adopt the City’s Civility Code, establish a Civility Code for members of the City Commission, and establish a Civility Code for City employees, when interacting with members of the public.”

The matter had been tabled at the last Commission meeting, as the Commission sought input from the Human Resources Department.

G-3: A Resolution of the City Commission of Coral Gables, Florida recognizing the month of November as “National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month” and expressing the City Commission’s support for efforts to eradicate Alzheimer’s Disease. (Sponsored by Commissioner Menendez)

“The City Commission deems it important to bring awareness to Alzheimer’s Disease and to the many families silently suffering because of it. The City Commission also embraces the opportunity to work with organizations dedicated to the fight against Alzheimer’s Disease, such as the Alzheimer’s Association, whose mission is to end Alzheimer’s and
other dementia by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support.”

G-4: A Resolution of the City Commission of Coral Gables, Florida waiving the City’s park-naming policies and procedures and designating the park located in Kings Bay, at 6540 Marlin Drive, as James H. Smith Park. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

“This resolution seeks to name the park commonly referred to as Marlin Park, located at 6540 Marlin Drive, in the gated community of Kings Bay. In the present case, members of the Kings Bay community expressed support to name the park after James H. Smith several years prior to the passage of the revisions in Resolution No. 2020-237. Mr. Smith was a husband, father, and the CEO of Americable International. He lived in Kings Bay and served admirably on the Board of Directors of Kings Bay for the better part of three decades. In 1993, Mr. Smith assembled a group of civic leaders in the community to evaluate the annexation of unincorporated Kings Bay. He eventually guided the working group and the greater community to seek annexation into the City of Coral Gables. He later hired an attorney, investing his own money to help the community through the annexation process. Following the community’s success at the city-level, Mr. Smith dedicated seven more years of perseverance and investment to work through a county moratorium on all annexations before Kings Bay was finally annexed into the City in 2002. Mr. Smith is recognized by his neighbors as the ultimate reason for Kings Bay‘s annexation into Coral Gables. The Kings Bay Board of Directors, the Kings Bay Homeowners Association, and Mr. Smith’s widow, Joy Smith, all unanimously and without reservation have endorsed the naming of the community’s neighborhood park after the late James H. Smith.”

G-5: Presentation from Leider Acoustics regarding noise levels. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

Item will be heard with F-1 at a time certain of 6:30PM.

G-6: Discussion and review of City website. (Sponsored by Commissioner Fors)

The City’s website has been in need of updating for several years. The Communications department has been looking into the possibility of updating the site.

G-7: Discussion of feasibility of automated location-based electronic notice of certain matters. (Sponsored by Commissioner Fors)

G-8: Discussion regarding the Passion/Passiflora Incarnation installation on Segovia. (Sponsored by Commissioner Fors)

G-9: Discussion regarding City entryways and related improvements. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

G-10: Discussion regarding Public Safety Aides Courtesy Notification Program re: parking over sidewalks, scooters blocking sidewalks, cardboard in trash pits, and unsafe /deep trash pits. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson) (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

G-11: Discussion regarding establishment of a Blue Ribbon Committee of residents to investigate and provide suggestions re: Mediterranean Ordinance, the process for review and application of Mediterranean Ordinance, Board of Architects’ review of preliminary schematic drawings, and process for residents to provide comments, in writing, on projects before the Development Review Committee and Board of Architects. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

G-12: Discussion regarding notice for Parking Advisory Board meetings to residents impacted by proposed changes to public parking spaces, residential parking permits and the reservation of public parking spaces for commercial businesses in front of residential properties. Discussion regarding institution of a pilot program on Ponce for removal of dual signage for residential parking permit signage where metered/pay-by-phone parking is also permitted. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

G-13: An update from staff regarding Ordinance 2016-30 that was passed on May 24, 2016 to provide a Buy American Preference in contracts for goods and general services. (Sponsored by Mayor Lago)

G-14: Staff up-date on the addition of comments and street addresses to the Development Review dashboard. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

G-15: Staff up-date regarding the control and eradication of strangler figs on Coral Way oak canopy. (Sponsored by Commissioner Anderson)

Boards/Committees Items

H-1: A Resolution of the City Commission approving Fiscal Year 2021-2022 Cultural Grant recipients and setting in place a funding mechanism contingent on the City ’s approved budget. (Unanimously recommended by the Cultural Development Board approval/denial vote: 7 to 0).

Click here to see the recommendations for Cultural Grants by the Cultural Development Board.

H-2: A Resolution of the City Commission approving artists for public art proposal submittals associated with the new public Parking Garage 7, Minorca Garage. (Unanimously recommended by the Cultural Development Board approval/denial vote: 5 to 0).

Click here to see the RFQ responses from proposal artists.

H-3: A Resolution of the City Commission approving proposed artists for Illuminate Coral Gables 2022, a temporary light-based public art exhibition and approving partial funding from the art acquisition fund (unanimously recommended by the Arts Advisory Panel approval/denial vote: 7 to 0, and the Cultural Development Board approval/denial vote: 7 to 0).

Illuminate Coral Gables used art exhibits from two artists who are sympathizers of totalitarian regimes who have imprisoned, repressed and murdered opponents in attempts to silence them. In a community, which has thousands of exiles from communist-socialist repressive regimes, the use of these artists was seen by some who brought the issue up to Commissioners as tasteless.

The matter was brought up by Mayor Lago at the last Commission meeting. However, in the approved artist list submitted to the Commission, one of the artists remains on the list. Cai Guo-Qiang has long been a reported sympathizer of the Chinese regime. He was instrumental in their artistic planning of the opening ceremonies of the Olympic games in China.

In an interview in 2018 with Frontpage, he was credited with saying, “Communism was successful in making people feel as though they have been transformed from being slaves to becoming the masters of the earth. Communism promoted a kind of utopian universalism. Communism is a very resourceful kind of -ism. It can make a large majority of uncultured peasants suddenly feel that they have thoughts and philosophy!”

H-4: A Resolution of the City Commission approving a public art exhibition by Kiki Smith, and for application to Art Basel and Miami Art Week, extending through winter, 2021-2022 (unanimously recommended by the Arts Advisory Panel approval/denial vote: 7 to 0, and the Cultural Development Board approval/denial vote: 7 to 0).

“The Arts Advisory Panel met and voted unanimously to recommend Kiki Smith’s ‘Blue Night’ as this year’s temporary exhibition artist and Art Basel special event artist. The Cultural Development Board was presented with, and accepted, the recommendation of the Arts Advisory Panel and voted unanimously in support of the project. Building on the established relationship with Art Basel, the City proposes to submit an Art Basel VIP event application to celebrate the exhibition. Funding for the exhibition and related expenses have been previously secured through the Art Acquisition Fund. The Arts Advisory Panel voted unanimously (7-0) to recommend support of Kiki Smith’s ‘Blue Night’ for application as an Art Basel 2021 event at their meeting on June 23, 2021. The Cultural Development Board voted unanimously (7-0) to recommend support of Kiki Smith’s ‘Blue Night’ for application as an Art Basel 2021 event at their meeting on June 30, 2021.”

H-5 and H-6: are discussions from the Commission on Commission-As-A-Whole appointments to the Transportation Advisory Board and the Sustainability Advisory Board.

City Manager Items

I-1: A Resolution of the City Commission with attachments, ratifying the Collective Bargaining Agreement between the City of Coral Gables and the Fraternal Order of Police, Coral Gables Lodge Number 7, for the period of October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2023.

Item is related to item F-6. “The City of Coral Gables (“City”) and the Fraternal Order of Police, Coral Gables Lodge Number 7 (“FOP”), have been negotiating a successor collective bargaining agreement and have reached an agreement for the period of October 1, 2020 through September 30, 2023 (the “Agreement”). The FOP has ratified the Agreement. Upon ratification of the Agreement by the City Commission, the Agreement will reflect the following material changes:
Article 14 “Workweek, Overtime and Shift Differential” Effective next shift bid after ratification: Increase afternoon shift differential to 5%; Increase midnight shift differential to 7%. Article 15 “Wages” Fiscal Year 2019-20 2% lump sum non-pensionable supplement. Fiscal Year 2020-21 2% across the board increase. Fiscal Year 2021-22 2% across the board increase. Fiscal Year 2022-23 2% across the board increase; and Addition of Step 14 to Pay Plan for rank of police officer. Article 18 “Promotions” Incorporate terms of promotional MOU. Article 23 “Holidays” Effective October 1, 2021, one (1) additional floating holiday for a total of three (3). Article 29 “Employee Organization & President” FOP President to serve the Union five (5) days during the week. Article 36 “Special Unit Allowances” Increase special unit allowance for Traffic Homicide from $75.00 bi-weekly to a 5% Increase in base pay. Article 38 “Retirement System” The maximum participation in the DROP shall be extended to 96 months. If employees remain employed by the City during their 8th year in the DROP, they will be assigned to road patrol unless otherwise directed by the Police Chief in his sole discretion. Effective October 1, 2022, the maximum amount of the annual normal retirement benefit based on the normal annuity form (life with 10 year certain) payable at retirement shall be the lesser of $98,838 or 75% of the employee’s average final compensation. Employees hired after the ratification date of this agreement who retired from other police agencies and are hired by the City as full-time police officers will have the option to participate in the Retirement System or a Defined Contribution Plan. Employees retired from the City’s police department who are hired as full-time police officers will only have the option to participate in the Defined Contribution Plan. If the employee participates in a Defined Contribution Plan established by the City, the City will contribute 7% of the employee’s base pay. The pension buy back formula for those employees hired prior to October 1, 2019, who had prior military or other public employer service, but were not eligible to purchase their prior service as of October 1, 2019 because they had not completed the requisite five (5) years of service with the City to be eligible to do so, shall be 18% of the employee’s
pensionable earning during their 1st year of service multiplied by the number of years being purchased. Article 40 “Group Health” Increase monthly contribution to the FOP sponsored medical insurance plan from $900 to $1000 per employee. Article 46 “Retiree Health Savings Plan” The employee’s final contribution to the PEHP upon separation from City service when added to the employee’s account balance shall be increased to an amount not to exceed $200,000.”

I-2: Presentation given by the Human Resources Department in conjunction with Labor Relations and Risk Management regarding the City’s complaint handling procedures (Civility Code).

Item is related to G-2.

I-3: A Resolution of the City Commission accepting the recommendation of the Chief Procurement Officer to award the Janitorial Maintenance Services contract RFP 2021-005 to SFM Janitorial Services, LLC., the highest ranked responsive-responsible proposer, pursuant to Section 2-763 of the Procurement Code entitled “Contract Award”.

“The purpose of this RFP is to award a qualified and experienced professional firm (‘Proposer’) to provide Janitorial Maintenance Services. Janitorial services include but are not limited to nightly cleaning of offices, restrooms and common areas, and day porter services to maintain restrooms and common areas clean while in use by City staff and visitors. There are 23 different City facilities listed in the RFP, with a provision to add/remove locations/services as needed throughout the term of the awarded contract. Also, a provision for emergency work and additional services is included. Said work includes, but is not limited to: water extraction, spills, infectious disease and post natural disasters cleanup, carpet cleaning, stripping & refinishing floors, high pressure cleaning, etc.”

I-4: A Resolution of the City Commission amending the Fiscal Year 2020-2021 amended annual budget to recognize as revenue Municipal, Mobility and Police, impact fees and to appropriate such funds to put toward the Minorca Garage construction and Trolley Building/PSAP Emergency Generator projects; and providing an effective date.

“Generally accepted fiscal policy dictates that the most restrictive funding sources such as bonds, grants & impact fees be utilized prior to less restrictive funding sources such as General Capital Improvement, Parking, and proprietary system funds. Consistent with this policy, staff regularly looks to replace less restrictive funding with more restrictive funding whenever possible. The first item in this budget amendment is a recommendation to replace General Capital Improvement/Parking funds in the Minorca Garage construction project (Garage 7) with more restrictive Coral Gables Impact Fees. The Minorca Garage is a project that complies with the Coral Gables Impact Fee use restrictions as it is an enhancement to municipal services as well as to future mobility needs. The project is funded by various sources including Parking Fees, General Capital Improvement funds, and previously approved Coral Gables Impact Fees. As of June 1, 2021, staff has identified impact fee collections for Municipal and Mobility improvements that are available for appropriation in the amounts of $201,478 and $575,792, respectively. Applying these funds to the Minorca Garage construction project will free up $777,270 of less restrictive General Capital Improvement/Parking fund dollars for redirection to more general capital projects in the upcoming FY22 budget. The second item in this budget amendment is a recommendation to appropriate available Police impact fees to fund the PSAP portion of the emergency generator installation currently being designed for the New Trolley Building. As of June 1, 2021, staff has identified available Police impact fee collections in the amounts of $81,605 and is recommending that this amount to put toward the PSAP portion of the generator project. The remaining portion of the project ($569,395) will be funded by CITT (Transportation) fund balance. Applying the impact fee dollars to this project will eliminate the need to fund it from less restrictive General Capital Improvement dollars.”

I-5: A Resolution of the City Commission of the City of Coral Gables, Florida establishing its intent to reimburse certain project costs incurred with proceeds of future tax -exempt financings; providing certain other matters in connection therewith; and providing an effective date.

“The City is considering constructing a new parking garage to be known as the Coral Gables Mobility Hub to replace the existing parking garage 1 (the “Project”). The Coral Gables Mobility Hub will be a mixeduse building that will host multiple transportation and mobility activities, including a 750 to 800 space parking garage and an activated roof. The City expects to finance such Project with a future tax-exempt financing. In order to commence the Project now and complete it in a timely manner, the City needs to start expending funds for the construction of the Project. Pursuant to the Internal Revenue Service Code (the “Code”) Section 1.150-2 of the Income Tax Regulations, the Code requires the City to declare its official intent to reimburse itself for any expenditures made for the construction of the Project prior to the financing. Adoption of the attached reimbursement resolution will constitute “a declaration of official intent.” After adoption of the reimbursement resolution, the City may reimburse itself for any expenditures which occurred 60 days prior to the adoption of the reimbursement resolution and forward.”

I-6: A Resolution of the City Commission accepting the recommendation of the Chief Procurement Officer to award the Mobility HUB Preconstruction & Construction CRM Services contract RFQ 2021-010 to The Weitz Company, LLC., the highest ranked responsive-responsible proposer, pursuant to Section 2-763 of the Procurement Code entitled “Contract Award”.

“The purpose of this RFQ is to select a qualified Construction Manager at Risk (CMR) firm for the successful completion of the State-Of-The-Art Mobility Hub Project, (the “Project”) who will provide preconstruction services during the design phase and subsequently an agreement to serve as the general contractor during the construction of the Project. The Mobility Hub will be a mixed-use building that will host multiple transportation and mobility activities for people visiting, living, and working in Coral Gables. The ground level of the Mobility Hub will most likely host the mobility related program components, including an internal drive-thru lane for ride sharing services to pick-up and drop-off users and have accessibility to other mobility uses at grade, as well as retail/flex-use space, bicycle storage, dockless vehicle parking, bike share docking stations, a wi-fi lounge, e-Commerce Logistics for drone package deliveries and pop-up coffee shops. Initially, the first supported level will be reserved for Electric Vehicles (EV), with charging stations on all spaces. The intermediate levels between the ground level and the rooftop will serve as self-parking levels when the building is opened. These levels have been designed to accommodate self-driving vehicles in the future since the garage consists of long span construction. The top level of the mixed-use building will be an active rooftop with open air uses for the public: potentially including landscaped areas, venue space, café/restaurant(s), lounging areas and/or areas to practice sports. On May 10, 2021, seven (7) firms submitted proposals in response to the RFQ: Florida Lemark Corporation, Kaufman Lynn Construction, Inc., KCV Constructors, Inc., Link Construction Group, Inc., NV2A Group, LLC., PCL Construction Services, Inc., and The Weitz Company, LLC. A responsiveness review determined that PCL Construction Services, Inc. would be deemed non-responsive and would receive no further consideration for award:(proposer failed to provide final statements prior to the opening of the RFQ). On June 9, 2021, the Evaluation Committee convened to evaluate the six (6) responsive and responsible proposals and ranked the firms in the following order of preference: The Weitz Company, LLC., (top-ranked), Kaufman Lynn Construction, Inc., (second ranked), KCV Constructors, Inc., (third ranked), NV2A Group, LLC., (fourth ranked), Florida Lemark Corporation, (fifth ranked), and Link Construction Group, Inc. (sixth ranked). The Evaluation Committee determined that the top three ranked firms, The Weitz Company, LLC.,(top-ranked) Kaufman Lynn Construction, Inc., (second ranked) and KCV Constructors, Inc. (third ranked) would continue to Oral Presentations. On June 17, 2021, the Evaluation Committee convened to hear Oral Presentations from the top three ranked firms. After listening to the Oral Presentations, the Evaluation Committee determined that The Weitz Company, LLC., was the highest ranked responsive-responsible proposer. The Public Works Director, upon consultation with the Chief Procurement Officer, concurs with the recommendation of the Evaluation/Selection Committee to award and negotiate a Pre-Construction Services Agreement with The Weitz Company, LLC., the top-ranked proposer, pursuant to Section 2-763 of the Procurement Code.”

I-7: Keep Coral Gables Beautiful Program Update.

Click here to see the presentation.

I-8: Staff presentation regarding 40-year building recertifications in the City.

Following the building collapse in Surfside, residents have been reaching out to the City to inquire about the 40-year recertifications in the City. While the county and other municipalities immediately began reviews of all buildings older than 40 years, Coral Gables has been waiting to discuss this item at the Commission meeting next week.

I-9: Request for City Commission direction on the preferred competitive process for the sale of the 350 Greco lot.

The controversial sale of the surface parking lot at 350 Greco Avenue to former Vice Mayor Frank C. Quesada and his partner (Vice Mayor Micheal Mena’s bosses) is coming back to the Commission for guidance on the process to move forward.

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6 thoughts on “Agenda Digest: Commission Meeting (7/13/2021)

  1. Remove Cai Guo-Qiang from approved artist list. If communism is so great in China why does he not live tbhere?

  2. Good move to wait on building recertification prior to a discussion.
    Majority of City buildings are on ridge[between SW 8th & 40th street].
    The City should consider continuing the 40 year period for these buildings but needs to consider more frequent & specific inspections on any and all high-rises near a Waterway[Edgewater Drive buildings] and in now previous wet-lands & near Bay such as Deering Bay complex.
    City should also consider confirming to all residential property owners[single/duplex] that their homes/properties are excluded form a 40 year certification.

  3. Excellent Coverage!!! I’m enjoying your “inside perspective” journalistic skills! Kudos and thank you

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